COMPARISON OF DIFFERENT MEDIA TO PRODUCE CYMBIDIUM ORCHIDS BY PSEUDOBULBS

Authors

  • Shahram Sedaghathoor Rasht branch, Islamic Azad University, Rasht, Iran. http://orcid.org/0000-0002-2438-2299
  • Gholamreza Golzari Dehno Faculty of Agriculture and Natural Resources, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran, Iran
  • Rohangiz Naderi Department of Horticulture, University of Tehran, Karaj, Iran
  • Sepideh Kalatehjari Department of Horticulture, Faculty of Agriculture and Natural Resources, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran, Iran
  • Behzad Kaviani Department of Horticulture, Faculty of Agriculture, Rasht Branch, Islamic Azad University, Rasht, Iran

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.32404/rean.v4i4.1701

Abstract

Nowadays, Orchids are one of the most commercial products in flower markets. One of the propagation methods for Cymbidium is using old pseudobulbs that are thrown out after flowering period. This research carried out using standard Cymbidium back-bulbs based on randomized complete block design with 5 treatments in 3 replications. The trial traits were leaf length, root length, leaf number and root number that were studied for 180 days. The results show that minimum length of root was significant under different growth beds. The minimum percent of rooting was observed in pure sand treatment. The maximum length was observed in pure perlite. The shortest of leaves were gained in perlite + sand treatment and the maximum leaf length was observed in pure perlite treatment. The maximum average of root percent was seen in pure perlite treatment.

Author Biographies

Shahram Sedaghathoor, Rasht branch, Islamic Azad University, Rasht, Iran.

Associate Prof.

Gholamreza Golzari Dehno, Faculty of Agriculture and Natural Resources, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran, Iran

PhD. Student of Horticulture,

Rohangiz Naderi, Department of Horticulture, University of Tehran, Karaj, Iran

Professor

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Published

14/11/2017

How to Cite

Sedaghathoor, S., Golzari Dehno, G., Naderi, R., Kalatehjari, S., & Kaviani, B. (2017). COMPARISON OF DIFFERENT MEDIA TO PRODUCE CYMBIDIUM ORCHIDS BY PSEUDOBULBS. REVISTA DE AGRICULTURA NEOTROPICAL, 4(4), 33–37. https://doi.org/10.32404/rean.v4i4.1701